[Listen] Why You Should Try Physically Writing Your Daily Schedule

This week’s digital content is sponsored by our friends at Lifeway Foods, the leading US supplier of kefir. Kefir is a cultured dairy drink with protein, vitamin D, and 12 live and active probiotics, which may support a healthy digestive and immune system. Show your guts some love with Lifeway Kefir! 

Welcome to the Daily Distance, a new daily series from the creators of #WeGotGoals. In these short episodes, we’re bringing you one daily goal you can set for yourself during this chaotic time- one actionable thing you can do to move your body, connect with a friend, prioritize your mental health, get some work done, and practice a little bit of self-care. 

Today, Kristen brings on Carrie Jackson Cheadle, a past guest and co-author (alongside Cindy Kuzma) of Rebound: Train Your Mind to Bounce Back Stronger from Sports Injuries. Carrie is a Mental Skills Coach and Certified Mental Performance Consultant, and she has tons of mental tricks up her sleeve to help you build resilience, whether you’re an injured athlete or dealing with a global pandemic. Her recommendation: try using a pen and paper to write down your daily schedule. Here’s why she recommends it, how doing so affects your brain, and how you can still show yourself grace and flexibility, even while following a pseudo-schedule.

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About Kristen Geil

A native of Lexington, Kentucky, Kristen moved to Chicago in 2011 and received her MA in Writing, Rhetoric, and Discourse from DePaul while trying to maintain her southern accent. Kristen grew up playing sports, and since moving to Chicago, she’s fallen in love with the lakefront running path and the lively group fitness scene. Now, as a currently retired marathoner and sweat junkie, you can usually find her trying new workouts around the city and meticulously crafting Instagram-friendly smoothie bowls. Kristen came on to A Sweat Life full-time in 2018 as Editor-in-Chief, and she spends her days managing writers, building content strategy, and fighting for the Oxford comma.