Five Workouts to Help you Befriend The Treadmill
  • December 16, 2015
  • asweatlife_Five-Workouts-to-Help-you-Befriend-The-Treadmill

    The winter months are by far the hardest to get through. The amount of daylight is limited, the temperature drops and precipitation comes in the form of snow. The commute to work gets longer and everything in nature loses its bright green tint. Gone are the days of running outside — and for Chicagoans, running along the lake — after work. Some brave runners face the harsh winter wind every day, but others aren’t as dedicated to outdoor activity and instead choose to hit the gym.

    If you’re like me, treadmills aren’t exactly your cup of tea. They’re constraining and don’t provide the stunning scenery that outdoor runs do. Simply put, running on a treadmill just isn’t the same as running outdoors — not to mention it’s boring to run in place for extended periods of time.

    But on those sub-zero days when it gets dark by 4:30 pm, sometimes the treadmill is your most viable option. Treadmills have to become a runner’s best friend in the wintertime.

    Taken from Runner’s World, Fitness Magazine and Competitor.com, here are five ways to make the best of winter running and befriend the treadmill.

    1. Repetition workout. After this workout, you’ll be ready to run plenty of reps outside once spring rolls around. Start out by running easily for 10 minutes. Next, run for three minutes at a speed that’s 20 seconds faster than your 5K pace — or your general race pace. Recover by slowly jogging for three minutes. Repeat this pattern three times.

    Once you complete the set of three runs and three recoveries, jog for another five minutes. Then repeat another set of three runs and three recoveries. As a cool down, run easily for five minutes.

    10 minutes Warm-up
    3 minutes 20 seconds faster than 5K pace/race pace
    3 minutes Jog
    3 minutes 20 seconds faster than 5K pace/race pace
    3 minutes Jog
    3 minutes 20 seconds faster than 5K pace/race pace
    3 minutes Jog
    5 minutes Jog
    3 minutes 20 seconds faster than 5K pace/race pace
    3 minutes Jog
    3 minutes 20 seconds faster than 5K pace/race pace
    3 minutes Jog
    3 minutes 20 seconds faster than 5K pace/race pace
    3 minutes Jog
    5 minutes Cool down

    2. Hills workout. If you want the treadmill to benefit your ability to run inclines, this workout is for you. For a warm-up, jog between one and three miles. Then start the tough part of the routine. Change the incline of the treadmill to a 6 to 8 percent grade and run for half a mile. After that, decrease your incline to 0 or 1 and run for three minutes. Repeat the pattern a total of six to eight times. Cool down by running between one and three miles.

    1-3 miles Warm-up
    ½ mile Run with a 6-8 grade incline
    3-4 minutes Jog at no incline
    ½ mile Run with a 6-8 grade incline
    3-4 minutes Jog at no incline
    ½ mile Run with a 6-8 grade incline
    3-4 minutes Job at no incline
    ½ mile Run with a 6-8 grade incline
    3-4 minutes Jog at no incline
    ½ mile Run with a 6-8 grade incline
    3-4 minutes Jog at no incline
    ½ mile Run with a 6-8 grade incline
    3-4 minutes Jog at no incline
    1-3 miles Cool down

    3. A 20-minute glute workout. This treadmill routine specifically targets your glutes. Fitness Magazine recommends a solid 4.0 speed throughout, but this can be adjusted for each person’s skill level. The routine primarily utilizes the Rated Perceived Exertion scale — or RPE for short. Your rate of perceived exertion measures how difficult an exercise is. Feel free to alter your speed and incline rate so it matches the RPE indicated in the table below.

    5 minutes 4 miles per hour 3-3.5 incline 5 RPE
    2 minutes 4 miles per hour 8-10 incline 7 RPE
    1 minute 4 miles per hour 4-6 incline 6 RPE
    2 minutes 4 miles per hour 10 incline 8 RPE
    1 minute 4 miles per hour 5-7 incline 7 RPE
    2 minutes 4 miles per hour 12 incline 9 RPE
    1 minute 4 miles per hour 10 incline 8 RPE
    1 minute 4 miles per hour 12 incline 9 RPE
    5 minutes 4 miles per hour 2-4 incline 5 RPE

    4. Pacing workout. This routine is all about working on speed. To start out, run between one and three miles for a warm-up. After that, run one mile at your marathon pace — or your general race pace. For the next three miles, increase your speed by 10 seconds per mile. Finish up with a one to three mile cool down.

    1-3 miles Warm-up
    1 mile Marathon pace/race pace
    1 mile 10 seconds faster than race pace
    1 mile 20 seconds faster than race pace
    1 mile 30 seconds faster than race pace
    1 mile Cool down 

    5. The 10-4 workout.

      Endurance is the focus of this longer workout. Begin this workout by warming up for 10 minutes, taking it at an easy pace on the treadmill. After your warm-up, run for 10 minutes at your current 10K pace — or your general race pace. Slow it down for four minutes to let your body recover. Repeat the pattern again. Finish the workout by cooling down for 10 minutes.
    10 minutes Warm-up pace
    10 minutes 10K pace/race pace
    4 minutes Jog/recover
    10 minutes 10K pace/race pace
    4 minutes Jog/recover
    10 minutes Cool down

     

    While the treadmill is no match for the outdoors, when the temperatures drop well below freezing, these workouts can help you stay focused on your running goals through the chilliest months.

    About Erin Dietsche

    Erin ran track from an early age, but it wasn’t until her parents "forced" her to join her high school cross country team that she fell in love with running. Since then, she’s become an avid runner and learned how to balance her running with her interest in eating chocolate. Erin graduated from the University of Iowa and currently works as a reporter for a healthcare publication. Outside of her job, she enjoys the theatre and writing plays. When she’s not writing, reading or running, Erin likes listening to rap music and playing the piano.

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